8th Oct. 2014: OeKG meeting with Lt. Colonel Florie Hajra

 

WOMEN IN THE KOSOVO POLICE

The Kosovo Police is dedicated to the fundamental rights afforded to citizens enshrined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, but also strives to mirror the spirit of these rights in the context of public service. Integrity, honesty, and transparency are core values along with a dedication to meritorious appointment, service and advancement reflecting the multi-ethnic and gender balance of the population we serve. These rights are guaranteed by our constitution, and reinforced by the Kosovo Police organization.

While Kosovo Police is fully dedicated to gender mainstreaming, the force is made up of less than 15% women, of which 12% are serving line officers in enforcement functions. As well, only a handful is of higher rank; 9 female officers are above the rank of Major.  Association of Women in Kosovo Police (AWKP) seeks to change this disparity through enhanced education programs, legislative lobbying functions, media outreach and targeted seminars.  AWKP was created with the goal of solving this inequality issue within KP with the assistance of our partners inside the organization, and out.

The Association of Women in Kosovo Police was founded in 2013 with the generous assistance of the UN Women in Kosovo. We are now recognized members of the International Association of Women Police. We represent the interests of our members, both sworn and civilian, to include their welfare and professional development as well as their goal to advance the role of women in law enforcement to include meaningful roles in the most important of public service providers, the police. At all levels, including international, AWKP is deeply committed to values that promote gender mainstreaming in public service.

We focus on health initiatives, recruiting strategies targeted toward potential female recruits, interagency cooperation on women’s issues as well as public outreach. We also work very closely with like-minded partners in the international community at the Kosovo and international level through ambassadors and ministers.

Because these issues are not only endemic to countries in transition, but worldwide, we found the best way to combat this problem was, with organizational support, banding together to form AWKP. Women are essential in maintaining peace and security at home and across the world in the law enforcement profession. Police reform initiatives such as analyzing recruitment strategies and encouraging women to take leadership roles will allow us to break down the social barriers that exist and to create a progressive, modern Kosovo Police organization dedicated to the service of all of Kosovo’s citizens.

 

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